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Natalie Dormer SDCC 2014 Portraits by Entertainment Weekly

Natalie Dormer SDCC 2014 Portraits by Entertainment Weekly

euo:

id rather be vain than have low esteem bc ive experienced both and trust me being vain is way better

For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

Everyone go read this immediately. As I decided last week, my life motto has been expanded from “Do your thing and don’t care if they like it” to include “If all your favorite books are by white men, I probably don’t think you’re a very interesting person.”

(via nitlon)

I officially look happiest when I’m holding food. 

Also Pocky was apparently promoting/sponsoring a festival and they were giving out oversized Pocky inflatables with every purchase. ‘Twas great.

1) Spicy salmon poke bowl.
2) Macaron ice cream (green tea flavored)
3) HUUUUUGE POCKY.

bookpatrol:

For Members Only: Library debuts in London

The latest foray in London’s busy members only club scene is Library, a book-centered destination with all the usual amenities plus a whole lot more.

It also offers a  boutique hotel on the premises and ”The Kitchen” which will feature rotating menus influenced by the latest cookbooks and will even have the author/chef  occasionally come in and cook. Then there is “Room Seven” with its floor to ceiling bookshelves which will showcase a collection of reading material chosen by select current authors. 

Forbes recently spoke with Ronald Ndoro, the man behind the concept who says one of the main draws of Library will be “the impressive roster of events lined up for members including book readings, live music and literary seminars. Art consultants Tani Burns and Andrew Hancock will curate a revolving series of exhibitions and 19 Greek Street, the design agency who oversaw the interiors of the club, will host dinners for the design community.”

And on what makes the Library different he says, “Obviously the fact that we double as a boutique hotel helps us to stand out. And of course our extensive collection of books. Members can come to read, to work, for a massage, for the gym, for a meal or to sleep!”

I have to remind myself this thing: if someone isn’t taking the time out of his/her busy life to hang out with me, he/she probably doesn’t like me.

wnderlst:

Garnet Lake, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California | Blake DeBock

wnderlst:

Garnet Lake, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California | Blake DeBock